Scoop plate: What product will allow my father, who has Parkinson's, to eat off of a plate more easily?

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What product will allow my father, who has Parkinson's, to eat off of a plate more easily?

Question

My father has Parkinson's and is finding it challenging to eat off of a standard dinner plate. Each time he tries to get food onto his fork or spoon, he finds that either the food slides off of his plate, or the plate slides away altogether. Do you know if there is a plate or bowl specifically designed for people with this condition?

Our answer

It can be very difficult for people with Parkinson's to eat off of standard tableware. Thankfully, there are a number of products available commercially that are specifically designed to help people with Parkinson's eat more easily. Below are direct links to some examples of such products:

  • Parsons Scoop Plate, by Parsons ADLParsons Scoop Plate by Parsons ADL (at Seniors Store) is a 9-inch plate with a wide outer rim that allows the user to grasp the plate while scooping food onto their cutlery. Additionally, the plate has a skid resistant base, which prevents it from sliding away. This product costs about $16 (Cdn), plus a shipping fee.
  • Food Bumper, by BIOS MedicalFood Bumper by BIOS Medical (at agecomfort.com) is a discreet dining aid ideal for people who would like to use standard tableware, but who have difficulty getting food onto the utensil. Food Bumper clips onto any circular dinner plate and essentially provides a wall so that food can be more easily pushed onto the utensil. This product costs about $17 (Cdn), plus a shipping fee. 
  • Section Plate with Lid, by ParsonsADLSection Plate with Lid by Parsons ADL (at Seniors Store) has three compartments to keep food separated. The high walls of each compartment can be used to help push food onto utensils, such as forks and spoons. This device costs about $20 (Cdn), plus a shipping fee. 
  • Melamine Non-Skid Scooper Bowl (at RehabMart.com) has a contoured lip that makes it easier to trap and push food onto cutlery. This device is available through a U.S. retailer and costs about $50 (U.S.).

 

Some technologies and devices may require an in-person assessment. Speak with your health care provider for additional information and support.

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